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Vaccinations
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Vaccinations are one of the most important components of effective wellness care for pets. Bellevue Animal Hospital works with animal owners to provide individualized vaccine schedules based on your pet’s species, environment and lifestyle.
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Canine Vaccinations

Canine Vaccinations

Puppy vaccines should start at 8 weeks of age. All puppies should get a series of DA2PP, Leptospirosis and Bordetella vaccines, as well as a rabies vaccine and others as dictated by their lifestyle.

Rabies, DA2PP and Leptospirosis are considered core vaccines, while Bordetella and Canine Influenza are considered lifestyle vaccines. All dogs, cats and ferrets in Washington state must have up-to-date rabies vaccines. Rabies is a deadly virus that can affect any mammal, including people and pets. The Rabies vaccine that puppies receive at 16 weeks of age is good for one year; after that, the rabies vaccine is good for three years.

DA2PP protects against four primary canine diseases -- distemper, adenovirus-2, parainfluenza and parvovirus. Because these diseases can be deadly and have no existing cures, regular vaccination is highly recommended to reduce your pooch’s risk, though it is not required by law.
Distemper
Canine distemper is a highly contagious viral illness that your dog can contract through direct contact with an infected animal or through indirect contact with the bedding or food bowls of infected animals or wildlife feces. Symptoms include a high fever, weakness, coughing, vomiting and diarrhea. As the disease progresses, it attacks the nervous system and may cause seizures and paralysis. For adult dogs, the mortality rate is less than 50 percent. For puppies, however, the mortality rate is as high as 80 percent.
Feline Vaccinations

Feline Vaccinations

Kitten vaccines should start at 8 weeks of age. All kittens should receive a series of FVRCP and Feline Leukemia vaccines as well as a Rabies vaccine.

Like dogs, cats have core and lifestyle vaccines. FVRCP and Rabies are core vaccines. The American Association of Feline Practitioners believes Feline Leukemia should be a core vaccine for the first 2 years of a cat's life. After 2 years of age, Feline Leukemia can become a lifestyle vaccination needed only by cats who go outside.

All dogs, cats and ferrets in Washington state must have up-to-date Rabies vaccines. Rabies is a deadly virus that can affect any mammal, including people and pets. Starting at 16 weeks of age, cats receive annual Rabies vaccines that are good for one year.

The FVRCP vaccine fights three feline viruses: rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia. These, along with feline leukemia, are the most common fatal viruses that could threaten the health of your cat.
Rhinotracheitis
Rhinotracheitis, caused by the feline herpes virus, is a common virus that invades the nose lining, sinuses, throat, windpipe and eye membranes. Signs include sneezing, nasal discharge, drooling, fever, lethargy and a noticeable loss of appetite. This viral infection is most common in cats with weakened immune systems, or those with physical or emotional stress. Cats in shelters often get rhinotracheitis from the stress of overcrowding, but genetically, purebred and longhaired cats are more predisposed.
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Canine Vaccinations

Canine Vaccinations

Puppy vaccines should start at 8 weeks of age. All puppies should get a series of DA2PP, Leptospirosis and Bordetella vaccines, as well as a rabies vaccine and others as dictated by their lifestyle.

Rabies, DA2PP and Leptospirosis are considered core vaccines, while Bordetella and Canine Influenza are considered lifestyle vaccines. All dogs, cats and ferrets in Washington state must have up-to-date rabies vaccines. Rabies is a deadly virus that can affect any mammal, including people and pets. The Rabies vaccine that puppies receive at 16 weeks of age is good for one year; after that, the rabies vaccine is good for three years.

DA2PP protects against four primary canine diseases -- distemper, adenovirus-2, parainfluenza and parvovirus. Because these diseases can be deadly and have no existing cures, regular vaccination is highly recommended to reduce your pooch’s risk, though it is not required by law.
Distemper
Canine distemper is a highly contagious viral illness that your dog can contract through direct contact with an infected animal or through indirect contact with the bedding or food bowls of infected animals or wildlife feces. Symptoms include a high fever, weakness, coughing, vomiting and diarrhea. As the disease progresses, it attacks the nervous system and may cause seizures and paralysis. For adult dogs, the mortality rate is less than 50 percent. For puppies, however, the mortality rate is as high as 80 percent.
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Feline Vaccinations

Feline Vaccinations

Kitten vaccines should start at 8 weeks of age. All kittens should receive a series of FVRCP and Feline Leukemia vaccines as well as a Rabies vaccine.

Like dogs, cats have core and lifestyle vaccines. FVRCP and Rabies are core vaccines. The American Association of Feline Practitioners believes Feline Leukemia should be a core vaccine for the first 2 years of a cat's life. After 2 years of age, Feline Leukemia can become a lifestyle vaccination needed only by cats who go outside.

All dogs, cats and ferrets in Washington state must have up-to-date Rabies vaccines. Rabies is a deadly virus that can affect any mammal, including people and pets. Starting at 16 weeks of age, cats receive annual Rabies vaccines that are good for one year.

The FVRCP vaccine fights three feline viruses: rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia. These, along with feline leukemia, are the most common fatal viruses that could threaten the health of your cat.
Rhinotracheitis
Rhinotracheitis, caused by the feline herpes virus, is a common virus that invades the nose lining, sinuses, throat, windpipe and eye membranes. Signs include sneezing, nasal discharge, drooling, fever, lethargy and a noticeable loss of appetite. This viral infection is most common in cats with weakened immune systems, or those with physical or emotional stress. Cats in shelters often get rhinotracheitis from the stress of overcrowding, but genetically, purebred and longhaired cats are more predisposed.

The best for your pet!

Bellevue Animal Hospital is proud to provide accessible and affordable vaccinations for pets and owners in Bellevue, West Bellevue, Mercer Island, Medina, Hunts Point, Factoria, Kirkland, Redmond, Issaquah and the surrounding areas.

The best for your pet!

Bellevue Animal Hospital is proud to provide accessible and affordable vaccinations for pets and owners in Bellevue, West Bellevue, Mercer Island, Medina, Hunts Point, Factoria, Kirkland, Redmond, Issaquah and the surrounding areas.
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Bellevue Animal Hospital has been serving Eastside dogs & cats since 1955.

Phone (425) 454 - 1246

Fax (425) 646 - 7281

10415 Main Street, Bellevue, WA 98004

Phone (425) 454 - 1246

Fax (425) 646 - 7281

10415 Main Street, Bellevue, WA 98004

Hospital Hours

Monday - Friday: 7:30am - 6:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am - 2:00pm
Sunday: Closed